The Concept of Kāmarāga in Theravāda Buddhism

Main Article Content

Dharma Rakshit Bhikkhu

Abstract

In general, the Pali Buddhist term ‘Kāmarāga’ is translated into English as ‘sensuality’.
It is a psychological phenomenon of the human condition, according to Buddhism, that
also encompasses the natural tendencies of all human beings; thus, it cannot be a problem.
Yet, Kāmarāga is considered a problem when it is clung to (upādāna) for the purpose of
securing permanent happiness in life. However, sensuality should be treated as a temporary
happiness. According to the view of Buddhism, sensuality in modern societies has been
understood in the wrong way.
The concept of Kāmarāga covered in the scope of this article is specifically in
reference to ‘sexuality’, because it is the primary aim of many humans to obtain this
experience. It’s the natural tendency of any human being that sexual gratification grows
along with maturity. Generally, the notion of sexual gratification is higher among humans.
Many individuals think sexual experience is emblematic of supreme happiness. Buddhism
sees sexual gratification and sexual experience as not being the supreme happiness of human
existence. This article explores Kāmarāga (sexual gratification) in the Buddhist scriptures.

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How to Cite
Bhikkhu, D. R. (2018). The Concept of Kāmarāga in Theravāda Buddhism. The Journal of International Association of Buddhist Universities (JIABU), 11(3), 84–93. Retrieved from https://so06.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/Jiabu/article/view/219061
Section
Research Article

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