ACHIEVEMENT AND LEARNING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM: THE CASE OF A FILIPINO SCHOLARS’ ORGANIZATION IN KOREA

Main Article Content

Inero V. Ancho
Sae-hoon Park

Abstract

Filipino Scholars in Korea or Pinoy Iskolars sa Korea, Inc. (PIKO), as an international academic and non-academic student organization, plays a vital role in the intellectual and social development of Filipino students in South Korea. As a representative organization, it reflects the challenges and experiences of the students in the mentioned country. With various activities initiated in and out of the academe in line with its advocacies, evidently, it affirms the contribution of the students in designing the trends of international education in that country. This participation is not only limited with the students’ academics, but it can be clearly seen through their social, cultural and political facets as well, not only in South Korea, but also in the Philippines.
Through PIKO, the lives of international students do not only focus on getting admitted to academic institutions abroad. The organization has an entire study-abroad opportunity for aspiring students leading to the motivation of pursuing an international higher education, being admitted to one’s university of preference, experiencing academic, social, and cultural life abroad, completing an academic degree, and eventually returning home. The author examines the narrative of PIKO as an organization, along with numerous social and academic advocacies that influence the organization’s vision.
With these, the article aims (a) to extrapolate the nature, purposes, and results of student migration through empirical data gathered from different literatures and studies, (b) to point out the importance of the internationalization of higher education for the improvement of the individual, the country, and the international community, (c) to emphasize the need of support for the international students’ culture adaptability mechanism, (d) to define what PIKO is and evaluate how the organization works to help Filipino international students in South Korea, and (e) to provide future researchers, campus administrators, and education specialists a reference to come up with their own academic and non-academic organization design that shall hone the whole aspects of both students and their environment promoting national and international development.


 

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How to Cite
Ancho, I. V., & Park, S.- hoon. (2019). ACHIEVEMENT AND LEARNING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM: THE CASE OF A FILIPINO SCHOLARS’ ORGANIZATION IN KOREA. JOURNAL OF EDUCATION NARESUAN UNIVERSITY, 21(2), 341-358. Retrieved from https://so06.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/edujournal_nu/article/view/112223
Section
Academic Articles

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