MULTIPLICATIVE DISCOURSE FOR MAKING PATTERNS IN MULTIPLICATION TABLE IN AN OPEN APPROACH CLASSROOM TEACHING: A SEMIOTIC ANALYSIS

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Jensamut Saengpun

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyze multiplication discourse for making patterns in multiplication table emerging in a mathematics classroom taught through open approach. The research was carried out in one second grade classroom in the project school innovated by Lesson Study and Open Approach. Qualitative methods were employed for collecting and analyzing data through classroom observation on 11 consecutive lessons on multiplication. Teaching protocols, students’ written works, field notes and classroom photographs were used as the research data. Semiotic analysis with protocol analysis was employed in this study. The research result revealed what and how multiplicative discourse of students and teacher played a major role in discovering meaning of multiplication and constructing multiplication tables in each steps of open approach as a teaching approach. Two types of multiplicative discourse found in making patterns in multiplication tables were univocal and dialogic discourse. Univocal discourse like “number set”, “adding it up”, “multiplier increases by 1” and “answers increase by…” students use played a role in drawing arrows to represent various way of algebraic pattern after making multiplication by themselves. Dialogic discourse as teacher’s revoicing of students’ thinking in classroom discussion helped students to reflect and adjust complex algebraic pattern embedded in multiplication tables. The findings showed a construction of a semiotic system of multiplicative discourse included a set of multiplication signs, rules of multiplication sign production and relationship between the signs and their meanings.

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Saengpun, J. (2020). MULTIPLICATIVE DISCOURSE FOR MAKING PATTERNS IN MULTIPLICATION TABLE IN AN OPEN APPROACH CLASSROOM TEACHING: A SEMIOTIC ANALYSIS. JOURNAL OF EDUCATION NARESUAN UNIVERSITY, 22(3), 1-11. Retrieved from https://so06.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/edujournal_nu/article/view/116303
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Research Articles

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