A STUDY OF SCIENTIFIC ANALYTICAL THINKING AND LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT OF TENTH GRADE STUDENTS THROUGH CONTEXT-BASED LEARNING EMPHASIZING ANALYTICAL THINKING ON SOLID LIQUID GAS

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Anupat Boonsathit
Kittima Panprueksa
Pattaraporn Chaiprasert

Abstract

The objectives of this research were to compare the posttest scores of students’ scientific analytical thinking and learning achievement through context-based learning emphasizing analytical thinking (CBL-EAT) on solids, liquids, and gases with pretest scores and to compare the posttest scores of students’ learning achievement through CBL-EAT on solids, liquids, and gases with the 70 percent criteria. The participants were 45 tenth grade students who were selected randomly using the cluster random sampling technique. The research instrument consisted of 1) CBL-EAT on solids, liquids, and gases lesson plans, 2) scientific analytical thinking test, and 3) learning achievement test. The data was analyzed by the percentage, mean, standard deviation, one sample t-test, and dependent samples t-test. The results of this study indicated that: The posttest scores of students’ scientific analytical thinking and learning achievement through CBL-EAT on solids, liquids, and gases were statistically significant higher than the pretest scores of those at the .01 level and the posttest scores of students’ learning achievement through CBL-EAT on solids, liquids, and gases were statistically significant higher than the 70 percent criteria at the .01 level.

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Boonsathit, A., Panprueksa, K., & Chaiprasert, P. (2019). A STUDY OF SCIENTIFIC ANALYTICAL THINKING AND LEARNING ACHIEVEMENT OF TENTH GRADE STUDENTS THROUGH CONTEXT-BASED LEARNING EMPHASIZING ANALYTICAL THINKING ON SOLID LIQUID GAS. JOURNAL OF EDUCATION NARESUAN UNIVERSITY, 22(1), 1-12. Retrieved from https://so06.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/edujournal_nu/article/view/127798
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Research Articles

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