ENHANCING PRESERVICE STEM TEACHERS’ STEM PCK AND TEACHING SELF-EFFICACY THROUGH STEM PCK-BASED COURSE WITH THE USES OF EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING COUPLED WITH WORKED EXAMPLE INSTRUCTIONAL PRINCIPLES

Main Article Content

Skonchai Chanunan

Abstract

Preparing preservice STEM teachers who have very limited teaching experience for such a very challenging job needs specific requirements. The purposes of the study were to develop the STEM PCK-based course using experiential learning coupled with worked example instructional principles and then to examine the impacts of the course on preservice STEM teachers’ STEM PCK and teaching self-efficacy. A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was employed in order to achieve comprehensive views of how the STEM PCK-based course impacts preservice STEM teachers. One of graduate courses was specifically developed and then implemented with 25 participating preservice science and mathematics teachers for 15 weeks in the first semester of 2016 at the Faculty of Education, Naresuan University, Thailand. For data collection, the writing test of STEM PCK conceptions and the STEM teaching self-efficacy instrument was developed and used with all participants as a part of quantitative data collection. While documentary analysis technique, the observation form, individual semi-structure interview with, and focus group discussion were also used in the qualitative part. For data analysis, a paired sample t-test was used along with basic descriptive statistics for quantitative data while content analysis technique was also employed for qualitative data. Drawn on both data, it is found that the developed STEMPCK-based course has positive impact on preservice STEM teachers’ STEM PCK and teaching self-efficacy. The qualitative data also reveal that direct and reflective experiences of STEM teaching and learning are very important for preservice teachers in developing their STEM teaching knowledge and confidence as assisting in making sense of STEM teaching experiences. They also recognize and value available supports and guidance along with opportunities for reflection and discussion with others. This study has provided teacher educators and STEM education community with promising and very useful information about ways to equip preservice teachers with educative tools for STEM education.

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Chanunan, S. (2020). ENHANCING PRESERVICE STEM TEACHERS’ STEM PCK AND TEACHING SELF-EFFICACY THROUGH STEM PCK-BASED COURSE WITH THE USES OF EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING COUPLED WITH WORKED EXAMPLE INSTRUCTIONAL PRINCIPLES. JOURNAL OF EDUCATION NARESUAN UNIVERSITY, 23(1), 45-73. Retrieved from https://so06.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/edujournal_nu/article/view/244048
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Research Articles

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