CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT INNOVATION OF PRIMARY SCHOOL BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF COLLABORATIVE EVALUATION AND STEM EDUCATION GOALS นวัตกรรมการพัฒนาหลักสูตรโรงเรียนประถมศึกษาตามแนวคิดการประเมินแบบร่วมมือและเป้าหมายของสะเต็มศึกษา

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Shunnawat Pungbangkradee
Sukanya Chaemchoy
Pruet Siribanpitak

Abstract

This research objectives were 1) to study the modified priority needs index of the primary school curriculum development, 2) to study the good practices of primary school curriculum development, and 3) to develop the curriculum development innovation of primary school based on the concept of collaborative evaluation and STEM education goals. The population is 26 primary STEM schools. Data were collected from the total population. The respondents consisted of 1) 208 stakeholders of 26 schools, consisted of 26 school administrators, 52 teachers, 52 parents, and 78 community members, 2) 30 stakeholders of 5 schools with good practice, consisted of 5 school administrators, 5 teachers, 5 parents, and 15 community members, and 3) 9 experts, consisted of 2 STEM experts, 1 collaborative evaluation expert, 1 innovation development expert, and 5 school administration experts. The research tools consisted of a questionnaire, an interview form, and an assessment form. The statistics used in data analysis were mean, standard deviation, content analysis, and PNImodified. The research revealed that:
1. The greatest needs for developing primary school curriculum based on the concept of collaborative evaluation and STEM education goals is the development of curriculum by collecting information from all stakeholders on the integration of knowledge in solving daily problems. (PNImodified = .111)
2. Good practices for developing primary school curriculum based on the concept of collaborative evaluation and STEM Education Goals consist of 4 guidelines consisted of Real-world integration curriculum designing, Interdisciplinary curriculum designing, Technology integration curriculum designing, and Student proficiency-based curriculum designing.
3. The curriculum development innovation of primary school based on the concept of collaborative evaluation and STEM education goals consist of Curriculum goals, Curriculum principles, Students’ key competencies, and Curriculum development flow chart.

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Pungbangkradee ช., Chaemchoy ส., & Siribanpitak พ. (2022). CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT INNOVATION OF PRIMARY SCHOOL BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF COLLABORATIVE EVALUATION AND STEM EDUCATION GOALS: นวัตกรรมการพัฒนาหลักสูตรโรงเรียนประถมศึกษาตามแนวคิดการประเมินแบบร่วมมือและเป้าหมายของสะเต็มศึกษา. JOURNAL OF EDUCATION NARESUAN UNIVERSITY, 24(2), 85–95. Retrieved from https://so06.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/edujournal_nu/article/view/254083
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Research Articles

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