A Factor Analysis and Enhancement of Adolescent Students’ Autonomy Through Group Counseling

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Seri Maichan

Abstract

The objectives of this  study  were  to analyze  adolescent   students’  autonomy   components, to reassemble group counseling  programs  and  to  compare  group  counseling  effectiveness  in  enhancing  the students’  autonomy.  The samples were 1,114 grade 1 - 3 Thai   adolescent  students  selected  for  the  autonomy component  study.  Subsequently, eight  students as  an experimental group and eight  students as  a  control  group  were  randomly selected from 24 Sansai Wittayakom School students with total autonomy scores at  25th  percentile and lower. A  Confirmatory   Factor  Analysis  verified   that   the   autonomy   functioning   model  was consistent with the empirical data and characterized into seven high loading factors  (p < .05);  namely, self-efficacy, self-regulation, self-reliance, self-confidence, self-responsibility, self-assertiveness and self-evaluation. Each factor covered four areas:  academic performance, personal care, peer relationship  and  parental/guardian connectedness.  A three- stage  group counseling, the   initial  stage, the transition  and  working  stage, and   the  final  stage, was constructed by  integrating  counseling  theories  and   techniques  to  enhance  the   students’  autonomy.  Statistically  significant  differences  (p < .05)   in  the  total  and  each autonomy component of the experimental group existed before, after counseling  and after the follow up period.   Moreover, statistically significant  differences  (p < .05)   in   the   total   and   each autonomy   component   between  the  experimental   group and   the control   group  existed before, after  counseling and after  the follow up period.

Article Details

How to Cite
Maichan, S. (1). A Factor Analysis and Enhancement of Adolescent Students’ Autonomy Through Group Counseling. The Journal of Behavioral Science, 6(1), 41-59. https://doi.org/10.14456/ijbs.2011.4
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Research Articles