Brand Alliance in Education : A Study of a Joint Degree Program between Asia-Pacific International University and La Sierra University

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Damrong Sattayawaksakul
Kraiwin Jongsuksathaporn

Abstract

          Due to high competition in Thailand's education industry, higher education institutions create new programs under international collaboration arrangement. Many studies have been focused on the antecedents of brand alliance evaluations in the view of tangible products. This research therefore intends to empirically investigate the impact of cross border education brand alliance. Building on several existing frameworks, it establishes self-brand connection as a new variable that influences consumer attitudes toward brand alliances, together with brand fit, brand knowledge, and attitude toward partner brands. In addition, this research also investigates the relationship between attitudes toward brand alliances and the intention to apply for the joint degree program.


          Based on the data collected from 101 questionnaire respondents, a series was conducted. Three hypotheses, except for two in the model for this study, were sustained. The results replicate previous research findings and confirm that brand knowledge and brand fit influences consumer attitudes toward brand alliances. These attitudes toward brand alliances then predict intention to apply for the joint degree program, consistent with prior research. This research contributes to empirical validation of the international brand alliance in the education industry, thereby helping education institutions, adopt appropriate brand strategies and achieve real benefits of joint degree program.

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References

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