Who are the Patani Peace Influencers? Exploring from Perspectives of Civil Society in Southern Thailand

Main Article Content

Anwar Koma
Ekkarin Tuansiri

Abstract

This research explores local civil society organizations’ (CSOs) view on peace influencers in southern Thailand. Its key puzzle is, according to the CSOs, who are considered to be Patani Peace Influencers? Because there is a lack of reliable resources to support peacebuilding on key peacemakers, this project uses exploratory research to collect data from Buddhists and Muslims in southern Thailand. The exploratory survey was launched from January-May 2021; it received 59 nominees from 48 nominators. The dense ranking was used to generate the updated list of 10 peace influencers in Patani. The result unveils that the top three peace influencers include Ismail Lutfi Japakiya, Rukchart Suwan, and Srisompob Jitpiromsri, respectively. The list suggests that although non-religious actors have primarily been nominated, the most influential actor in the area remains the religious scholar.

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How to Cite
Koma, A., & Tuansiri, E. . (2021). Who are the Patani Peace Influencers? Exploring from Perspectives of Civil Society in Southern Thailand. Asia Social Issues, 15(1), 250031. https://doi.org/10.48048/asi.2022.250031
Section
Research Article
Author Biography

Anwar Koma, Faculty of Political Science, Prince of Songkla University, Pattani Campus, Pattani 94000, Thailand

Lecturer at the Faculty of Political Science and Acting Head of Turkish Studies Center, Prince of Songkla University-Pattani Campus, Rusamilae, Muang, Pattani, Thailand, 94000.

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