Museum : Guidelines on The Suitability Exhibition of Objects and Content for People with Visual Impairments

  • สิรินกานต์ ผ่องประเสริฐ Center of Excellence in Universal Design Faculty of Architecture, Chulalongkorn University
  • สุจิตรา จิระวาณิชย์กุล Center of Excellence in Universal Design Faculty of Architecture, Chulalongkorn University

Abstract

Abstract

             This article which emphasizes the importance of the visually impaired museum visitors aims to need these people can access the information or knowledge equally as much as normal people and support social inclusion. By researching documents and compiling related research articles, found that people with visual impairments can use their senses to access information for loss of sight compensation, fulfilling the vision and create a mental image (vision of mind) by hearing and touch. Therefore, the suitability exhibition of objects and content for people with visual impairments are 1) using real exhibit objects or artifacts or models properly, and 2) presenting exhibit content with information in auditory and/or tactile format e.g. audio description: AD and/or printed braille and/or dotted braille. These will provide the people with visual impairments access the information more conveniently and memorize them in their mind endlessly.

Keywords: Museum; People with visual impairments; Objects and content; Perception; Senses

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Published
2020-01-09
How to Cite
ผ่องประเสริฐส., & จิระวาณิชย์กุลส. (2020). Museum : Guidelines on The Suitability Exhibition of Objects and Content for People with Visual Impairments. TLA Bulletin (Thai Library Association), 63(2), 24-49. Retrieved from https://so06.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tla_bulletin/article/view/233926
Section
Academic Articles